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Vermont schools will grill students on their Thanksgiving celebrations, governor announces

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott said during a press conference on Tuesday that schools in the state will include new questions during daily health checks  about whether students and their parents attended gatherings outside of their households following the Thanksgiving holiday. 

Scott noted that any students who attend events with more than just their immediate household will be required to either take online classes for a two-week quarantine period or quarantine for a week and then have a negative COVID-19 test.

“We understand how difficult this is, but since we know these types of gatherings have been the cause of so many outbreaks, we’ve got to do all we can to slow this down,” Scott said. 

The governor also encouraged businesses to take the same approach with their employees.

“From my standpoint, this is fair warning to those of you who are planning to have gatherings from outside your household for

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  • November 25, 2020
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Lucky, stressed and ready to graduate: How 4 college students spent an unprecedented fall semester

This summer, MarketWatch spoke to four college students as they prepared for a fall semester unlike any other. We recently checked back in to see how the pandemic has affected their studies and the way they’re thinking about their futures. 

The fall semester has been busy for Luz Chavez. The 23-year-old is a senior at Trinity Washington University in Washington, D.C. and after a college journey that included a few years at a community college and now almost two years at Trinity, she’s eager to finish her schooling. 

To make sure she fulfills her requirements to graduate in the spring, Chavez is taking seven classes totaling 20 credits this semester while living with her family outside the District of Columbia. “It’s been really stressful trying to juggle seven classes plus 30 hours of work every week,” said Chavez, who works as a fellow for United We Dream, an immigrant youth

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  • November 25, 2020
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Lucky, stressed, and ready to graduate — How 4 college students spent an unprecedented fall semester

This summer, MarketWatch spoke to four college students as they prepared for a fall semester unlike any other. We recently checked back in to see how the pandemic has affected their studies and the way they’re thinking about their futures. 

The fall semester has been busy for Luz Chavez. The 23-year-old is a senior at Trinity Washington University in Washington, D.C. and after a college journey that included a few years at a community college and now almost two years at Trinity, she’s eager to finish her schooling. 

To make sure she fulfills her requirements to graduate in the spring, Chavez is taking seven classes totaling 20 credits this semester while living with her family outside of Washington, D.C. “It’s been really stressful trying to juggle seven classes plus 30 hours of work every week,” said Chavez, who also works as a fellow for United We Dream, an immigrant youth

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  • November 24, 2020
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WSU, EWU, Gonzaga ask students to stay home after Thanksgiving

Universities in eastern Washington are telling students not to come back if they head home for the holidays.

SPOKANE, Wash. — As the COVID-19 pandemic raged throughout the year, university leaders across the Inland Northwest spent their late Spring and Summer months forming a plan to safely teach college students during the Fall 2020 semester.

Now, with holiday season on the horizon, the plans from Eastern Washington’s biggest colleges all include the same message: “If you go home for the holidays, stay home.”

That was a key factor in Washington State University’s earliest plan, says Phil Weiler, Vice President for Marketing and Communications for the university. Weiler said WSU built their semester over the summer to be as close to all-online as possible, with just a handful of classes requiring in-person learning for specialized technology or equipment.

But for the final few weeks, Weiler said, every class will make the

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  • November 21, 2020
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Minn. college students face a real-life test: Go home for Thanksgiving?

Even though she already has had COVID-19, Emma Zellmer is hesitant about returning home from college for Thanksgiving.

The Minnesota State University, Mankato junior is leaning toward spending the holiday with her immediate family at their Eagan home, but she likely won’t decide until a day or two beforehand to make sure no one has been exposed to the virus. It’s a dilemma that thousands of college students in Minnesota are facing ahead of the holiday break.

“I’m still within that period where I shouldn’t be able to get it again,” Zellmer said. “However, I still want to make sure since the science is kind of unclear on [immunity].”

Amid a semester of mostly online classes and social distancing, college students are eager to see their families but worry they could bring the virus home or catch it once they get there. Many students will have little reason to stay

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  • November 21, 2020
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‘Keep Grandma safe,’ colleges implore students heading home | Coronavirus

Days after the federal government warned against Thanksgiving travel, college students will be fanning out across the U.S. Every itinerary raises risks somewhere.

With COVID rates at their highest ever, most schools are telling students to return home — and stay. But they aren’t requiring testing or quarantining to prevent them from bringing the virus home to mom and dad. A handful are even allowing them to return to campus after the break.

The movement of students, already thought to have contributed to the summer surge, could make for an even more fearful spread as families gather at the holiday table. Since many colleges returned to campus in late August, average new confirmed cases each day in the U.S. have nearly quadrupled.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday recommended against traveling and celebrating the holiday with non-household members — a category that would extend to students

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  • November 21, 2020
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New River Valley college students travel home for holidays

NEW RIVER VALLEY, Va. (WDBJ) -Friday marked the last day of in person instruction for college students in the New River Valley.

Schedule changes were put into place at Virginia Tech and Radford University to prevent too much travel to and from both campuses, especially with the holiday season right around the corner. Virginia Tech shifts to a one week Thanksgiving break followed up by one week of online instruction and a week of virtual final exams. Radford students took their last finals on Friday.

“We did it, we finished the fall 2020 semester here on the Radford University campus,” said university spokesperson Caitlyn Scaggs. “We had a comprehensive plan in place and that guided us so well, and at the same time we were adaptive to the challenges that came up along the way.”

Leaders from both schools can now take a deep breath after watching cases surge with

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  • November 21, 2020
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College students face a real-life test: Go home for Thanksgiving?

Even though she already had COVID-19, Emma Zellmer is hesitant about returning home from college for Thanksgiving.

The Minnesota State University, Mankato junior is leaning toward spending the holiday with her immediate family at their Eagan home, but she likely won’t decide until a day or two beforehand to make sure no one has been exposed to the virus. It’s a dilemma that thousands of college students in Minnesota are facing ahead of the holiday break.

“I’m still within that period where I shouldn’t be able to get it again,” Zellmer said. “However, I still want to make sure since the science is kind of unclear on [immunity].”

Amid a semester of mostly online classes and social distancing, college students are eager to see their families but worry they could bring the virus home or catch it once they get there. Many students will have little reason to stay on

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  • November 20, 2020
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Students consider no-cost COVID-19 testing before Thanksgiving break

As Thanksgiving break approaches and students prepare to travel home, Elon University students are considering whether or not to get tested for the coronavirus. Beginning on Nov. 16, Elon began providing pre-departure COVID-19 testing at no cost to students, faculty and staff. 

To get tested before departing from campus this Thanksgiving students can make an appointment online. To get tested with the new Abbott BinaxNow antigen test, students will go to Alumni Gym at their designated time, follow the testing directions and return an hour later to receive their results. The antigen test is quicker and cheaper than the PCR. Positive results will be confirmed with an additional PCR test, and negative results do not have to be retested. 

Some students, like freshman Jacqueline VonTersch, want the peace of mind that comes with a negative result and she doesn’t want to spread the virus to her family.

“I’m traveling, and

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  • November 19, 2020
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Penn State professors, students struggle with international research | University Park Campus | Penn State | Daily Collegian

As some American states and European nations reenter a lockdown due to rising cases of the coronavirus, international travel remains in limbo.

While college classes have largely been shifted online, the world of academic field work cannot be so easily altered, according to Penn State researchers.

Travel shutdowns and rising coronavirus cases have stalled the research of students and professors, many of whom study vital and timely subjects.

Sridhar Anandakrishnan, a professor in the geosciences department at Penn State, studies glaciers and their relation to global sea level.

His work in Earth’s polar regions has been halted by the progression of the coronavirus. In late July, Anandakrishnan was set to study in Greenland, but that expedition was canceled.

If not for the coronavirus, Anandakrishnan would currently be camped on Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica.

This glacier has been monitored by glaciologists because of its vulnerability to climate change. Delays in study

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  • November 18, 2020