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Crust & Crumb Cafe launches ‘Starving Artist Series’ to showcase local artists, engage with community during pandemic | State College News | Daily Collegian

Having opened its doors at the start of Penn State’s fall semester, the Crust & Crumb Cafe on Beaver Avenue is looking to establish itself within the downtown State College community amid the coronavirus pandemic by playing into its “artisan-inspired” atmosphere.

To accomplish this goal, cafe owner Amber Winkler and local artist Chloe Jean, who also works at the cafe as a barista, partnered to create the Starving Artist Series — a monthly, after-hours event that utilizes the cafe to showcase the work of different artists in the area. 

According to Jean, the event came about when she reached out to Winkler about displaying some of her work in the cafe. 

Jean said she recently finished a series of four abstract watercolor prints depicting nude women in support of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and she wanted to further promote these pieces. After she asked Winkler about displaying her work,

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  • November 5, 2020
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Artists in Isolation Make a New Window on the World

This article is part of our latest Fine Arts & Exhibits special report, which focuses on how art endures and inspires, even in the darkest of times.

For centuries, artists and poets have escaped the world of people by choice, opting out to find clarity or to see from a different perspective. The earliest drawings known to have been made by humans have been found in the deep, dark recesses of caves, spaces since supplanted by the modern studio.

But many artists have very social sides to their lives and practices as well — exhibiting work, lecturing, attending openings — that have largely stopped as they, and everyone else, have been forced into involuntary isolation by the pandemic.

For some, along with that separation has come a kind of acceptance of a new set of limits, among them the inability to travel freely and a change in how they

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  • October 23, 2020
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A New Hamptons Gallery Showcases Rare Works From Blue-Chip Artists and Designers

The Hamptons, once considered by the well-heeled as just a spot to vacation, has become a place of long-term residence for many as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. Even art galleries like Pace and Skarstedt have opened outposts there. Now, the world of collectible furnishings has made its way to Southampton’s shores in the form of humorously named new art and design gallery Sèlavy.

Sèlavy is the brainchild of Christina and Emmanuel Di Donna, the founders of Di Donna Galleries in Manhattan. While their NYC outpost focuses primarily on surrealist and modern art, Sèlavy will present art alongside design, creating a dialogue between the two and fostering an environment that’s more immersive than a white-wall gallery.

More from Robb Report

“Sélavy is about how people actually live with art,” said Emmanuel Di Donna in a statement. “We have always been driven by the concept of living with art, which

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These artists look for light in the darkness of the pandemic

BALTIMORE — The view from 19 stories above St. Paul Street in midtown Baltimore affords the 85-year-old artist Raoul Middleman plenty of subject matter for his daily paintings in watercolor and gouache: The harbor and Francis Scott Key Bridge, Canton and Clinton Street, cargo cranes and railroad tracks, the Belvedere Hotel, Green Mount Cemetery, City Hall and the old city jail.

Six months into the pandemic, and he’s never become bored with the scenery.

“Are you kidding? No,” Middleman says over the phone from the condominium where he lives with his wife, the painter and printmaker Ruth Channing. “The harbor and the skies. The Baltimore skies are fantastic. Summer storms, lightning, the sunsets. There’s always a surprise, and when you paint there’s always a discovery. Your identity is always shifting, and nature is always shifting, changing tangentially to a prism of varying insights.”

Middleman speaks the way he paints —

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Baltimore artists look for light in the darkness of the pandemic

The view from 19 stories above St. Paul Street in midtown Baltimore affords the 85-year-old artist Raoul Middleman plenty of subject matter for his daily paintings in watercolor and gouache: The harbor and Francis Scott Key Bridge, Canton and Clinton Street, cargo cranes and railroad tracks, the Belvedere Hotel, Green Mount Cemetery, City Hall and the old city jail.

Six months into the pandemic, and he’s never become bored with the scenery.

“Are you kidding? No,” Middleman says over the phone from the condominium where he lives with his wife, the painter and printmaker Ruth Channing. “The harbor and the skies. The Baltimore skies are fantastic. Summer storms, lightning, the sunsets. There’s always a surprise, and when you paint there’s always a discovery. Your identity is always shifting, and nature is always shifting, changing tangentially to a prism of varying insights.”

Middleman speaks the way he paints — impatiently. He’s

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