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Fauci urges Americans to conduct ‘risk-benefit assessment’ before holiday travel

Top infectious disease expert Anthony FauciAnthony FauciSunday shows preview: Biden transition, COVID-19 spike in spotlight Pressure rises for rapid COVID-19 testing White House largely silent on health precautions for Thanksgiving MORE urged Americans on Sunday to conduct a “risk-benefit assessment” before traveling for the holidays as Thanksgiving approaches this week.

Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), told NBC News’ “Meet the Press” that families need to consider the risks of gathering indoors. He said families especially need to take into account if their gatherings plan to include those who are elderly or have underlying conditions affecting their immune system.

“I think the people in this country need to realistically do a risk-benefit assessment,” he said. “Every family is different. Everyone has a different level of risk that they want to tolerate.”

The NIAID director acknowledged that holiday gatherings “have been such joyous

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  • November 22, 2020
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Stay home this Thanksgiving, Fauci says

CDC releases COVID-19 guidelines for Halloween

Besides trick-or-treating, the CDC also identified trunk-or-treating, indoor costume parties, haunted houses, hayrides and tractor rides, and rural fall festivals as high-risk COVID-19 activities.

ExploreMake sure COVID doesn’t come home for holidays

“Thanksgiving is a time when many families travel long distances to celebrate together,” the CDC said on its website. “Travel increases the chance of getting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. If you must travel, be informed of the risks involved.”

ExploreAJC’s full coronavirus coverage

Here is how the CDC is ranking Thanksgiving traditions in terms of risk:

Lower risk: Small dinners with only people who live in your household; preparing traditional family recipes for family and neighbors, especially those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and delivering them in a way that doesn’t involve contact

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  • October 15, 2020
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Boo! CDC shuns trick-or-treating; Fauci on ‘The Daily Show’ is no laughing matter; US nears 200K deaths

The U.S. death toll from the coronavirus was quietly poised to surpass 200,000 on Tuesday, less than eight months after the first American fatality.

The U.S. reached 100,000 deaths in May. Now, some experts estimate the death toll could double by year’s end.

Fatigue for social distancing and the push to get back into offices and schools could fuel new cases – and deaths – in the coming weeks and months. Experts at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington predict 410,000 deaths by January.

Life marches on. Hollywood is primed to make a comeback after months of filming delays, and the Centers for Disease Control has issued guidelines for relatively safe Halloween celebrations. Traditional trick-or-treating gets the thumbs-down. And a public relations staffer at the National Institutes of Health is set to “retire” after being exposed for writing articles on a conservative website that

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  • September 22, 2020
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Vaccine won’t immediately end pandemic, Fauci says; Puerto Rico reopens beaches; US downgrades Mexico travel warning

Drug developers are racing to create a vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed.

A return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home.

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students represent 19

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  • September 12, 2020
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Studies highlight risks in dining, daycare; vaccine won’t immediately end pandemic, Fauci says

Drug developers are racing to create a vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed. 

A return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home. 

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students represent 19

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  • September 12, 2020
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‘Normal living’ will come months after vaccine, Fauci says; Florida bars to re-open at half-capacity

On the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack, Americans are struggling with feelings of safety once again as another American is diagnosed with the coronavirus every 2.45 seconds.

While a race to a vaccine is widely considered the only path back to a pre-pandemic way of life, Dr. Anthony Fauci cautioned that a safe and effective vaccine will not immediately bring back normalcy.

A return to “normal living” — life without masks and physical distancing, where people can go to a movie or a large gathering without fear of becoming infected with COVID-19 — won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Fauci, said on CNN.

The director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said infection rates need to drop dramatically, something expected after the months-long logistical nightmare of manufacturing hundreds of millions of vaccines and distributing them.

Meanwhile, most state case counts

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  • September 12, 2020
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Fauci debunks online theories about COVID mortality rates; NYC delays start of in-class learning

California’s latest reopening plan drew scrutiny, Florida’s governor vowed no more lockdowns, and New York City delayed in-school learning Tuesday, one day after the nation reached 6 million confirmed cases of coronavirus.

A new month could bring new hope to Californians who suffered through their deadliest COVID-19 month in August. The state reported 3,707 deaths connected to COVID-19 in the last month, up 18% over July. But infection and hospitalization rates have been in decline in recent weeks, and average daily deaths also began dropping, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis.

In Iowa, the nation’s latest hot spot, Iowa State University is planning to have around 25,000 fans at its home opener Sept. 12. White House coronavirus experts have warned Iowa leaders that the state has the country’s steepest outbreak and suggested the state should close bars in 61 counties and test all returning college students.

Nationally, Dr. Anthony

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  • September 1, 2020
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Dr. Anthony Fauci calls US plateau of cases ‘unacceptable’; Beirut explosion devastates ‘struggling’ health system

Days after President Donald Trump defended his administration’s “incredible” handling of the coronavirus outbreak in a widely viewed interview, the nation’s top health official called the country’s response “disparate” and “not as well suited” to the dynamics of the pandemic.

“What happened when the rubber hit the road on this, and we did get hit, we had the kind of response that was not as well suited to what the dynamics of this outbreak is,” Dr. Anthony Fauci said during a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health forum Wednesday. “What happened is, we had a bit of a disparate response.”

The country’s response has allowed the daily COVID-19 case count to plateau at an “unacceptable level,” Fauci said, warning that the U.S. will continue to “smolder” without a unified effort to stop the virus. 

Here are some significant developments:

  • A deadly explosion that rocked Lebanon’s capital city of Beirut

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Colleges could reopen if they test students every 2 days; Fauci ‘cautiously optimistic’ for vaccine this year

In its biggest coronavirus vaccine deal yet, the U.S. said Friday it will pay French pharmaceutical company Sanofi and Great Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline up to $2.1 billion to test and produce 100 million doses of an experimental coronavirus vaccine.

The deal is part of Operation Warp Speed, a White House-led initiative aimed at getting a vaccine to stop SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

On Capitol Hill, Dr. Anthony Fauci testified Friday before a special House panel. He told the committee that he’s “cautiously optimistic” that by late fall or early winter a vaccine now being tested would be deemed safe and effective.

Also in Washington, the extra $600 in federal unemployment aid that helped many Americans stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic is expiring as plans for additional stimulus stalled in a deadlocked Senate.

Here are some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has recorded more than 152,000 deaths

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Fauci ‘cautiously optimistic’ of safe vaccine by early winter; Hong Kong delays elections; Vietnam records first death

Dr. Anthony Fauci returned to Capitol Hill on Friday to testify before a special House panel. His testimony comes at a time when early progress on combating COVID-19 seems to have been lost and uncertainty clouds the nation’s path forward.

He told the committee that he’s “cautiously optimistic” that by late fall or early winter a vaccine now being tested would be deemed safe and effective.

Also in Washington, the extra $600 in federal unemployment aid that helped many Americans stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic is expiring as plans for additional stimulus stalled in a deadlocked Senate.

A new survey shows fewer Americans want to resume daily activities like going to restaurants or sending children to school as cases spike. But as the school year approaches, state officials are releasing guidelines for schools to reopen. Increasingly, teachers are worried about their students’ mental health.

Here are some significant developments:

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