Blog Archive

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What H-1B Visa Changes Could Mean for Tech Startups

Changes to the H-1B visa program announced in October will make qualifying for the work visas much tougher and compel employers to pay foreign workers drastically higher wages. U.S. technology startup founders and investors say the limitations will hamstring their ability to recruit top-tier talent to grow their businesses.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
1. The rules hit especially hard for tech startups.

Founders and rank-and-file workers at these companies are often immigrants. Nearly a third of all venture-backed startups are founded by immigrants, according to a 2016 report from the National Bureau of Economic Research. More than half of startups valued at $1 billion or more have at least one immigrant founder, according to a 2018 paper from the National Foundation for American Policy, a nonpartisan think tank.

2. Startups say the pay rules are unaffordable.

Tech startups usually pay employees a lower salary but compensate with stock options. The wages mandated

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  • November 4, 2020
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70 inmates return to Hudson County as part of massive statewide prisoner release

Seventy prisoners returned to Hudson County from New Jersey correctional facilities Wednesday as part of a statewide prisoner release to slow the spread of COVID-19 inside the prison system.

More than 2,000 inmates nearing the end of their sentences walked out of New Jersey state prisons — which have recorded the highest coronavirus death rate in the nation — and headed for home on Wednesday.

Hudson County spokesman Jim Kennelly said the county’s Department of Family Services was working with state agencies to make sure that all the prisoners returning to Hudson County had access to certain resources.

“None of these people are being dropped into the community without some kind of initial social safety net to allow them to put their life back together,” Kennelly said.

The majority of the 70 people returning to Hudson County have housing lined up with friends or family, Kennelly said, adding that a

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  • November 4, 2020
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Ways People Use Personal Loans

Few Americans have the cash they need on hand to pay for big-ticket items upfront. That’s why it’s not unusual for people to take out mortgages, car loans and student loans, so they can pay for these costly expenses over time.

But when it comes to other major purchases — like home renovations, engagement rings, medical bills — an increasing number of Americans are turning to personal loans to help manage the cost.

Personal loans are the fastest-growing debt category, according to a 2019 Experian study. While mortgages still made up the largest portion of consumer debt (71.7%), in 2019, Americans reportedly took out personal loans at a faster rate than auto loans, mortgages, credit cards and student loans.

A form of installment credit, personal loans are sometimes used as an affordable alternative to credit cards because they generally charge lower interest rates. Personal loan APR averages 9.34% according to

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  • November 4, 2020
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Opinion | Rufus Woods: Bilingual history project will tell important stories of our past | Education

My late father Wilfred for decades shared his love of North Central Washington history with the readers of The Wenatchee World through his Talking It Over column. He was a voracious reader and had an uncanny ability to integrate knowledge and pass along insights.

There is an emerging local history project that he would be very excited about — a bilingual history of Wenatchee and East Wenatchee that has been written by local history buff Chris Rader in collaboration with retired veterinarian Carin Smith.

Histories that have been written about the valley have for the most part missed the influence and involvement of Native Americans, Asians and Latinos. And there are no histories in Spanish, despite the fact that more than 30 percent of our residents are Latino. This fact was raised by civic volunteer Teresa Zepeda in a conversation with Smith. She was eager to learn more about the

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  • November 4, 2020
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This Gluten-Free Sweet Potato Pie Is Like Fall on a Plate

Consider this your guide to healthier baking. Chef Mia Rigden and Jenny Dorsey team up to show you how to revamp some of your favorite baked goods to make them healthier and loaded with better-for-you ingredients—without skimping on flavor. See All

This gluten-free sweet potato tart is guaranteed to be a hit at your quarantine Thanksgiving.

There are some dishes that tend to be considered classic Thanksgiving fare, like roast turkey, cranberry sauce, and sweet potato pie. But if you have specific health or dietary restrictions, sometimes those classics are a bit harder to recreate with swaps and substitutions unless you’re a pro…which is why we enlisted one to share a gluten-free sweet potato pie in the latest episode of our show Alt-Baking Bootcamp.

Host—baker and fitness instructor Sashah Handal—makes her dish with some key swaps and upgrades. “So the really exciting part about this recipe is the Japanese

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  • November 4, 2020
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Thinking about moving to Canada after the election? COVID-19 could affect your plans

Researching residency requirements for other countries and threatening to move to Canada when the presidential election doesn’t go your way is becoming a quadrennial tradition.

Due to an unprecedented number of mail-in ballots and early votes cast, the 2020 election for president hasn’t been called yet and may not be settled for days. So that’s giving nervous voters a little extra time to daydream about becoming an expatriate.

Most voters don’t follow through on the old “If my candidate loses, I’m moving to Canada” threat, but if they’re serious about it now, the COVID-19 pandemic may throw a wrench in their plans.

Right now, simply visiting Canada is difficult. The pandemic has resulted in a nearly eight-month closure of the U.S.-Canada land border, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said that won’t change until America gets its COVID-19 infection rate under control.  

“Until further notice, most foreign nationals cannot travel

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  • November 4, 2020
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Ever Feel Secondhand Embarrassment For Someone? There’s A Word For That.

Were you cringing through the entirety of “Borat 2”? Did hearing the details of CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin’s masturbating-on-a-Zoom-conference-call horror show make you want to die a little inside?

The Germans have a word that describes exactly what you were experiencing (because of course they do).

“Fremdschämen” is the feeling you get when someone does something so awkward or embarrassing, you end up feeling secondhand embarrassment for them.

“It’s basically the notion or feeling of shame or embarrassment particularly toward people you don’t personally know and oftentimes never met in real life,” said Ales Pickar, a German writer who occasionally shares German language lessons on his YouTube channel.

Unlike schadenfreude, the increasingly well-known German term that describes the unique pleasure we get from watching people we don’t like experience misfortune, fremdschämen isn’t a feeling of cruelty. It’s a word full of empathy, actually.

With fremdschämen, you’re embarrassed for the

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  • November 4, 2020
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Denver Election Results 2020 Update

If President Donald Trump wins another four years in office, don’t blame Denver. Voters in the Mile High City preferred Joe Biden by an enormous margin — and they also voted for numerous progressive ballot measures, including new taxes earmarked to address climate concerns and the homelessness crisis.

The latest results from Denver’s Election Division were updated at 11:30 p.m. on November 3, and while they’re not yet official, none of the contests can be classified as a nail-biter right now. The smallest margin on a ballot measure is currently in the 10 percent range.

When it came to the presidency, Denver dwellers showed clear partiality: Biden and running mate Kamala Harris collected more than 82 percent of the vote, to just over 15 percent for Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. Likewise, former Denver mayor (and Colorado governor) John Hickenlooper owes much of his sizable victory over incumbent Cory

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  • November 4, 2020
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Surprise Stadium Information Guide | Texas Rangers

Radios/Televisions:

Hand-held radios and personal televisions are welcome as long as they do not interfere with other guests’ enjoyment of the game. Surprise Stadium reserves the right to ask any guest to discontinue use of such devices.

Rain Delay:

The right to delay the start of a game rests with the home club. Once both team managers meet with the home plate umpire and exchange line-up cards, the right to determine whether the game shall be interrupted or terminated is at the discretion of the Umpire-in-Chief and/or teams. Per the Official Playing Rules, the Umpire-in-Chief shall have sole and unquestioned authority to determine whether and when play shall be halted during a game, when play shall be resumed, and whether and when a game shall be terminated because of bad weather or unsafe playing conditions.

Rain Out Policy:

In the event that a Texas Rangers or Kansas City Royals home

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  • November 4, 2020
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Gambling in the U.S.: Is it the new cultural norm? : Augusta Free Press

online casino

(© Rawf8 – stock.adobe.com)

The United States prides itself on having been built on promoting individual liberty and equality. The nation, however, clung to its Puritan roots for a long time when it came to gambling. In 1630, the possession of dice and cards had been outlawed in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. In the Wild West, it was common for professional gamblers to be lynched. By the turn of the 20th century, even state-sponsored lotteries had been snuffed out. Today, American attitudes toward gambling are rapidly changing.

Over the past few decades, the US has relaxed its stance on recreational drug use, sexuality, and gambling. When evaluated in terms of financial activity, gambling is

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  • November 4, 2020